Southwest Project Management Toastmasters Club Speaker Invitation

Posted by admin on 09/25/2019 12:00 am  /   Spotlights

Southwest Project Management Toastmasters Club Speaker Invitation

YOU ARE INVITED!

What?

Southwest Project Management Toastmasters Club

Mission - Our members are dedicated to opening doors for one another to achieve greater professional success than anyone could on their own. Our club members include executives and managers at many of the Global and local companies who are volunteering to build inspiring leaders and increase professional speaking capabilities of our members.

Who?

The Southwest Project Management Toastmasters Club (Sponsored by the PMI Houston Chapter) would like to collaborate with PMIH to invite guest speakers to its club for an opportunity to share insights and provide a positive supporting environment where our members can elevate their Project Management skills and leverage them at their workplace and the PMI community.

When?

We meet every second and fourth Wednesday of each month and we would really appreciate if you can help us to nominate 1 speaker every month or two. Meeting Dates – 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM, the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of every month (9/24, 10/9, 10/23, 11/6, 11/20, 12/11).

  • The format of the speech is generally 5-7 minutes or 8-10 minutes depending on the request of the speaker. 
  • If the speaker is already a part of a Toastmaster Group, the speech would be credited to their pathway.

Where?

The Forum @ The Schlumberger, 210 Schlumberger Drive, Sugar Land 77478.

How?

If you are interested in these speaking opportunities, please contact Avishek Roy Chowdhury, Vice President-Public Relations for the Southwest Project Management Toastmasters Club at [email protected].


October 2019 - Toastmasters Clubs Tips and Discussions

Posted by StarChapter on 09/25/2019 12:00 am  /   Toastmasters

Project Management Toastmasters Clubs
Tips and Discussions                   

Quote: "Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

44. Trust your instincts.

With leadership and public speaking, it’s always important to trust your instincts. If your gut tells you to steer into another direction or bring up a certain topic, listen to what it says.

Tips for the Perfect Toast

  • Identify yourself with a brief explanation of your relationship to the toastee.
  • Be prepared. Use an opening, body & conclusion.
  • Stay focused & on topic. A toast should last no longer than 3 min
  • Get personal. A toast should be original, heartfelt & customized for the occasion.
  • Use humor, but do not embarrass the toastee or use offensife language.
  • Be creative, avoid cliches and consider a relevant quote.
  • Stand, lift your glass by the stem, and say “I’d like to propose a toast”.
  • Practice makes perfect


Emotional Intelligence; The Other Kind of Smart

“When dealing with people, remember that we are not dealing with creatures of logic, We are dealing with creatures of emotion.”—Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People

  • Choose to be optimistic; It feels better” Dalai Lama
  • Stress doesn’t sideline those with high EI. They manage their emotions with effective coping skills.
  • High EI workers “keep their cool” when things don’t go according to plan.
  • Strong EI people let go of the past, learn from mistakes and move on.
  • Constant learning, growth, a zest for new ideas, driven by self-respect, not ego are the hallmarks of high EI people. They are open to feedback and suggestions for improvement.
  • High EI workers aren’t afraid of boundaries. They politely and firmly express their boundaries.
  • EI savvy workers get along and cooperate with others and cooperate in productive teams. They have the people skills to develop relationships with a diverse group of people in the increasingly global workplace.
  • Empathy is the essence of emotional intelligence and is the biggest single leadership skill in today’s world.
  • Connecting with people effectively requires strong listening skills. Everyone has a desire to be heard.  Here are five ways to develop listening skills:  
    • Be Fully Present: Don’t try to formulate a response while someone else is talking.
    • Put Yourself in Their Shoes: As per Stephen Covey, “Seek first to understand, then to be understood”
    • Let the Speaker Know You Understood: Ask a clarifying question to demonstrate you heard.
    • Practice Active Listening: It is much easier to focus on the speaker when you aren’t thinking of how to respond.
    • Create Curiosity: Curios people see all conversations as learning opportunities.
  • Check your Emotional Intelligence in an informal quiz at “www.theotherkindofsmart.com”

 

“Speaking Skills” Excerpted from July 2019 Toastmasters Magazine

“Emotional Intelligence” Excerpted from July 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Harvey Deutschendorf

You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.   


September 2019: Toastmasters Tips & Discussions

Posted by admin on 09/05/2019 3:58 pm  /   Toastmasters

Project Management Toastmasters Clubs

Tips and Discussions

              Quote: "Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

      Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

43. Don’t take things personally.

Your audience may have strong opinions about a topic, especially if it’s controversial. Consider their responses educational.

Bringing Characters to Life in Your Story

By adding characters, real or imagined, you give your speech a real-life dimension and draw in your life.  Character development can be considered a 3 step process.

1>Mindset> Be willing to be fare more expressive than we think prudent.

2>Portrait> Develop a mental picture of each character.  Exaggeration is good.

3>Mechanics> To make these characters happen, mimic the voice and physical characteristics you imagine. 

Using dialogue in your speeches is a valuable tool for engaging your audience and bringing your characters to life.

 

Productivity Hacks from Toastmasters

  • Try the 5-second rule to avoid procrastination. If you have an impulse to act on a goal, you must take action within 5 seconds or your brain will kill the idea. Count down from 5 to 1, then act.
  • Try the Focus Funnel to use your time more effectively.
    • Eliminate - Ask yourself if the task is worth doing.
    • Automate - Can the task be automated
    • Delegate - Can the task be more effectively handled by someone else
    • If it must be done now: Concentrate
    • If it can be done later - Procrastinate - on purpose. Batch items like an email response
  • Identify your Einstein Window (Start your critical tasks when you are most alert & focused)
  • Create Public Accountability for your goals. Publicizing goals makes you more accountable for accomplishing them. 

 

“The value of life is not about what you get, but what you give” (Maimunah Natasha, DTM)

``````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

“Bringing Characters to Life” Excerpted from June 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Bill Brown, DTM

“Reframe Your Life in 5 Seconds” Excerpted from March 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Dave Zielinski

 ```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.