February 2020: Toastmasters Tips & Discussions

Posted by admin on 01/31/2020 12:04 pm  /   Toastmasters

Project Management Toastmasters Clubs

Tips and Discussions

                 

Quotes: "Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

  

  • “Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic, they are ideally set up to understand stories.” --  Roger Schank, Entrepreneur

 

  • “Great stories happen to those who can tell them.” – Ira Glass, NPR Radio Host and Producer

 

  • “I’m writing my story so that others may see fragments of themselves.” – Lena Waithe, Screenwriter

 

  • “If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” – Rudyard Kipling, Author

 

From Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

 

  1. Know the dress code.Research the culture of the audience and how they dress. Dress one level higher than the audience – typically business or business casual.

 

Storytelling Tips from Craig Valentine

  • Don’t just establish a conflict, escalate it.
  • Invite your audience into your scene. You might say, “Imagine you were in my shoes”.
  • Condense to connect. When you create a scene, don’t tell us everything, just tell us the main thing.
  • Come out of your story and talk to the audience. You may look into the audience and ask a question to keep them focused on active participants instead of passive spectators.
  • Make your audience curious from the beginning. Tease them before you tell them.
  • Don’t keep repeating your message. If you keep talking after you have made your point, your audience will lose interest.
  • Create characters. Use posture, positioning, and change of voice to bring characters alive.
  • Show the emotional change in your character. After you transcend your conflict, make sure your audience recognizes the transformation. If there’s no change, there’s no story.
  • Be subtle with most of what you do delivery-wise. Look up to show a child is talking to an adult.
  • With a few exceptions, keep your stories short. The longer you work on a story, the shorter it should get.

 

 “Using Stories to Breathe Life into Every Speech” Excerpted from December 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Craig Valentine

 

You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.   


January 2020: Toastmasters - Tips & Discussions

Posted by admin on 01/07/2020 7:57 pm  /   Home Page Highlights, Toastmasters

Project Management Toastmasters Clubs

Tips and Discussions

 

Quote: "Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

 

From Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

47. Know when to lose your script.Gauge your audience’s response to your message and know when to change or lose the script. If your audience seems bored or uninterested, move onto to something else.

 

There is No Sweeter Sound to a Person Than Their Own Name (Dale Carnegie)

  • Today, 85% of people middle-aged or older have trouble remembering names.
  • Techniques to help remember names
    • Use the person’s name immediately more than once, “Anne, I am glad to meet you. Anne, how do you know Beth?”
    • Ask the person how to spell their name, “Anne, is your name spelled with an ‘e’?
    • Create a mental image related to the name.

 

Everyone Has a Story

The human mind is wired to be receptive to stories.  If you want to connect with others, share a story.  Everyone can relate to stories with a universal theme.   Some popular story themes:

  • Your family history. To make it memorable, tie it to a learning point or universal truth.
  • Consider these topics for stories: First day at school, First pet, Childhood best friend, First girlfriend/boyfriend, First breakup, Favorite vacation, First job, First home on your own.
  • Check out stories at: The Moth (themoth.org), StoryCorps (www.storycorps.org), This American Life (www.thisamericanlife.org), or Serial (www.serialpodcast.org)

 

Storytelling Tips from Craig Valentine

  • Build a “foundational phrase”. Keep it under 10 words. (i.e. “Don’t get ready, stay ready”)
  • Don’t start every story from the beginning. Mix it up.
  • Get to your stories quicker, then go rapidly into the conflict and hook your audience.
  • Don’t be the guru of your own story. Let someone else offer the life-changing advice.
  • The longer you work on a story, the shorter it should get.
  • Pause and look. Remember you can’t rush and resonate.  Add pauses for effect.

 

Remembering Names excerpted from “How to Win Friends & Influence People” by Dale Carnegie

“Everyone Has a Story ” Excerpted from December 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Craig Harrison

“Using Stories to Breathe Life into Every Speech” Excerpted from December 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Craig Valentine

 

You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.   

 


December 2019: Toastmasters Tips & Discussions

Posted by admin on 12/23/2019 5:18 pm  /   Toastmasters

Project Management Toastmasters Clubs

Tips and Discussions

                 

"Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

-  Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

46. Learn from your mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes. The important thing is to appreciate the lesson you learned, and keep moving forward.

 

 

3 Steps to Crafting Clear, Concise Documents

  1. Write a draft version
  • Identify the purpose of your document, then write with the purpose in mind
  • Outline first to develop a structure
    • Opening -Write the opening last
    • Body (with 3 to 5 main points) - Write the body first
    • Conclusion -Write the Conclusion second

  1. Revise
  • Edit in spaced sessions; Reflection provides the mental distance for improvement
  • Strive to Eliminate wordiness; Use clear and concise words, Use active rather than passive sentence structure, Fulfill the document’s purpose
  • Reduce Text; Use lists, tables, bullets for visual impact. Put detail in appendices.

  1. Polish
  • Record & Listen to yourself reading the document.
  • Polish more if it doesn’t flow.

 

Want to be More Likable?

Likability goes a long way toward getting elected, hired, promoted, motivating people or closing deals.

  • Likability has four elements (1-Being interesting, 2-Being transparent, 3-Being generous, 4-Finding similarities)
  • Learn to be Likable (1-Ask questions, 2-Be vulnerable, 3-Be present, 4-Use people’s names, 5-Smile and be friendly
  • Habits that make people unlikable (1-Talking about themselves too much, 2-Competing in conversations, 3-Name-dropping, 4-Gossiping or sharing confidences
  • If you want to be liked, simply like others for who they are.

 

 

“3 Steps to Crafting Clear, Concise Documents” Excerpted from November 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Barbara Bashein
“Want to Be More Likable ” Excerpted from November 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Karen Friedman
You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 
Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.