February 2020: Toastmasters Tips & Discussions

Posted by admin on 01/31/2020 12:04 pm  /   Toastmasters

Project Management Toastmasters Clubs

Tips and Discussions

                 

Quotes: "Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

  

  • “Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic, they are ideally set up to understand stories.” --  Roger Schank, Entrepreneur

 

  • “Great stories happen to those who can tell them.” – Ira Glass, NPR Radio Host and Producer

 

  • “I’m writing my story so that others may see fragments of themselves.” – Lena Waithe, Screenwriter

 

  • “If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” – Rudyard Kipling, Author

 

From Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

 

  1. Know the dress code.Research the culture of the audience and how they dress. Dress one level higher than the audience – typically business or business casual.

 

Storytelling Tips from Craig Valentine

  • Don’t just establish a conflict, escalate it.
  • Invite your audience into your scene. You might say, “Imagine you were in my shoes”.
  • Condense to connect. When you create a scene, don’t tell us everything, just tell us the main thing.
  • Come out of your story and talk to the audience. You may look into the audience and ask a question to keep them focused on active participants instead of passive spectators.
  • Make your audience curious from the beginning. Tease them before you tell them.
  • Don’t keep repeating your message. If you keep talking after you have made your point, your audience will lose interest.
  • Create characters. Use posture, positioning, and change of voice to bring characters alive.
  • Show the emotional change in your character. After you transcend your conflict, make sure your audience recognizes the transformation. If there’s no change, there’s no story.
  • Be subtle with most of what you do delivery-wise. Look up to show a child is talking to an adult.
  • With a few exceptions, keep your stories short. The longer you work on a story, the shorter it should get.

 

 “Using Stories to Breathe Life into Every Speech” Excerpted from December 2019 Toastmasters Magazine article by Craig Valentine

 

You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.