June Toastmasters - Tips and Discussions

     

    Quote: “Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

    • Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

     

    1. Don’t overload your slides. Keep your slides concise; don’t overload them with too many talking points.

     

    Commencement Lessons

    • Relationships Matter> People thrive in relationships. If you do not build them over time, they will not be there.
    • Words Matter> Encourage, Uplift, Recognize, Thank others with intent. Remember how others’ words have affected you.  Take the opportunity to make a difference to others.
    • You Matter> When Einstein was asked to show his lab, he pointed to his head. Before an idea can be can be put into action, someone must think of it.

     

    Being a Good Conversationalist Aids the Job Search

    • Good Conversation is a two-way communication. It involves all the senses including non-verbal, eye contact & interested listening
    • Aim for a 50-50 balance of talking and listening.
    • Be focused when listening and talking.
    • Open-ended questions fuel the conversation. Avoid Yes/No questions.
    • Use the WAIT (Why Am I Talking) technique to judge whether you are dominating the conversation.

     

    Nail Your Workplace Presentation

    • Choose the Main Point of your presentation
    • Select your opening and closing to emphasize the main point of the presentation
    • Practice aloud and in real time
    • Time your presentation practice so you won’t go over the time limit
    • Remember the audience needs twice as long to digest your speech as you do to present it, so slow down and uses pauses frequently.
    • If you use notes, don’t speak while looking down at them. Deliver the information to the audience by looking at them.
    • Project your voice to the back of the room.
    • Don’t be afraid to pause.
    • Use stories to illustrate or make your point
    • With slides, explain the relevance of each slide to the story.
    • Transition gracefully to the master of ceremonies or next speaker, as appropriate.
    • If presenting online, look into the camera as much as possible, rather than at your notes or screen.
    • If presenting online, test your technology ahead of time to minimize real-time issues.

     

    -“Being a Good Conversationalist” Excerpted from Houston Chronicle article of May 18, 2018, by Kimberly Thompson

    -“In the Beginning” Excerpted from Toastmaster magazine, May 2018, authored by Will Newman

    -“Nail your Workplace Presentation” Excerpted from Toastmaster magazine, May 2018, authored by Joel Schwartzberg

     

    You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

    Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominantly professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.   

     

    Tips and Discussions - May 2018

    Quote: "Those who tell the stories rule the world” – Native American Proverb

    -  Toastmaster International's "90 Tips From 90 Years"

    1. Share a startling fact.Everyone loves an interesting piece of information. Be sure to share something that audience will find surprising.

    Vocal Variety 2.0 – Three Techniques to Sound Your Best

    • Give it all you’ve Got. If you want your audience to perceive you as a 5 out of 10, you have to perform as a 7. Try recording yourself as you would plan to speak, then again going way over the top.  Wait a day and listen to the recording. You will be amazed.
    • Emphasize words naturally. To get the emphasis right, record yourself speaking conversationally to a friend.  The emphasis from a conversation is likely to have the right balance.
    • Don’t swallow the last word in your sentence. The most important words are often the last words in a sentence.  Don’t de-emphasize them.  Don’t swallow them.  Give them the importance that they deserve.

    Comedy Made Easy 

    • If there is no surprise. . . humor dies. One of the primary reasons people laugh is because of surprise, and what causes surprise is the unexpected.  Rodney Dangerfield famously said, “My wife and I were happy for twenty years . . .  and then we met.”
    • If they only hear half . . . they will never laugh. Make sure that everyone in the room can hear eery word that you say, especially the punch line.
    • When you say it last . . . they hae a blast.  Put the punch line at the very end.  If you don’t, you will be talking while your audience is laughing.  This is known as stepping on your laughs.
    • If there is no pause . . . there won’t be applause.  Comic timing can be learned.  Three pauses go into comedic timing.  One pause comes prior to the joke; another is inserted right before the punch line; and a third comes after the punch line is delivered.  The first pause draws attention, the second pause sets up the joke, the third pause comes at the end so you don’t step on the audience’s laughter.

    Tall Tale Tips

    • Have fun Writing, rehearsing and telling your tall tale.
    • If your looking for an idea, identify a conflict from your past.
    • Incorporate what you have learned from other speaking opportunities.
    • Practice, practice, practice

     

    Some “Very” Good Writing Advice from Mark Twain

    Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ’very’; your editor will take it out and the writing will be as it should be.  To avoid ‘very’ & ‘really’ to emphasize an adjective, simply choose a better adjective.

     

    -“Vocal Variety” Excerpted from Toastmaster magazine, Feb 2016, authored by Bill Brown DTM: http://www.billbrownspeechcoach.com/

    -“Humor Speech Tips” Excerpted from Toastmaster magazine, Feb 2016, authored by David Kline Lovett, DTM

    -“Tall Tale Tips” Excerpted from Toastmaster magazine, Feb 2016, authored by Mitch Mirkin, CTM

    -“Some “Very” Good Advice” Excerpted from Toastmaster magazine, April 2018, authored by John Zimmer, ACB, ALB

     

    You can learn more about telling your stories at a Project Management Toastmasters Club! 

    Project Management Toastmasters clubs are open to all, but members are predominately professional project managers. Houston Area Project Management Toastmasters Clubs are sponsored by PMI Houston and aligned with the goals of PMI International.   Certified PMPs receive Professional Development Units (PDUs) for participation.